Notifications
Clear all

Subcool super soil - smaller batches  

Page 2 / 2
  RSS
Fish
 Fish
(@lovetoflyfish)
Linalool
100 Likes
250 Likes
500 Likes
1K Likes
2.5K Likes
Respected Member
Points: 10235

@hart fuck me that’s a post brother👏

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 31, 2020 6:34 pm
twisted1, Macky and Hart liked
Phenohunter88
(@leafnation88)
Geraniol
100 Likes
Percy Grower
Points: 713

Ok. So this was the first and only batch we have made so far. The soil is currently being used for its second grow. After the first grow, the soil went back in to the tupperware, was re-amended (slightly) and cooked for about three weeks. The second grow is about 1.5 months from harvest, no nutrient deficiencies to date and they're looking beautiful.

We will be looking to do up another batch in a month or so, these suggestions will be great to look over and potentially make positive modifications on something that's been working for us already. Of course the goal is to increase yield/quality with each grow, these discussions will definitely help with that.

Our recipe is quite different than Sub-cool's, our modifications were made based on various articles across the interwebs, not a chance I could cite references to show how we got there, that research was too long ago, and obviously not well documented....but i can tell you the changes made perfect sense at the time lol. Please feel free to let me know what you think.

90L Pro Mix HP

20L Worm Castings

1/3 Cup Azomite

1/2 Cup Lime Dolamite

1/2 Cup of Epsom Salts

1KG Oyster Shell Flour (Gaia Green)

1KG Alfalfa Meal

1KG Kelp Meal

1.5KG Blood Meal

2KG Bone Meal 

15 KG Red Rock

8.5L Perlite

 

 

Hey, if i'm not back in ten minutes...call the Police

ReplyQuote
Posted : March 31, 2020 10:44 pm
Canna_Educator_, Hart, twisted1 and 2 people liked
Hart
 Hart
(@hart)
Caryophyllene
250 Likes
500 Likes
100 Likes
Grow Off Diary
1K Likes
Respected Member
Points: 14887

@leafnation88 What's red rock? After TG's response, my next mix I'm going to try one without the dusts, certainly not cheap are they. I did some www searches and came across this... 

Rock Dust & Remineralization

New to Rockdust? Here’s a brief primer.

Rock Dust & Remineralization

If you’re coming into organic growing and perhaps done a bit of light reading, you’ve likely noticed the term remineralization in many of your sources. If you haven’t, remineralization is the utilization of rock dust in your soil to provide a slow release of minerals and trace elements. Using rock dust in your garden mimics the earths natural cycle of fertility, as soil and rock wear down and are leached into the water it accumulates in glaciers; during ice age these minerals are returned to earth. Over time volcanic activity pulls minerals and metals from their slumber deep in the earth, and volcanic ash helps spread them to the wind. But not all rock dust are equal, or optimal for any grow condition. Let’s take a look at their differences, and find which will work best for your garden. The major types of rock dust, or remineralization products, marketed to growers today are: Azomite, Glacial Rock Dust, Basalt, Gypsum, and Sea-90. That’s quite a selection, and some have uses that others do not, so rightfully some people may be confused about which to use, or which ones are okay to be used together.

Azomite®: The name itself stands for “A to Z of Minerals Including Trace Elements”. Azomite® is a combination of volcanic dust that filled a nearby seabed, creating hydrated sodium calcium aluminosilicate with the presence of other trace minerals. Azomite® contains a rather high amount of metal ions. In particular aluminum, some of which has already bound with silica to form aluminosilicate which will not be broken down by bacteria found in most soil; further any extra aluminum binds with silica you water-in, forming more non-soluble aluminosilicate. Containing the highest amount of lead and arsenic of any of the rock dust, which is a serious consideration for the average gardener not only in handling and safety, but when growing crops that could accumulate those compounds. It does however, contain the greatest amounts of rare elements and minerals, which is particularly useful when growing food crops. All in all, Azomite® is a suitable tool for mineralization if it’s what’s on hand locally, or if growing food, but perhaps not if growing cannabis.

Glacial Rock Dust: GRD (Glacial Rock Dust) as the name implies, is rock dust that is the result of weathering of rocks that has accrued in glacial formation; then as the glaciers recede they leave behind a glacial moraine. These glacial moraines are then mined, and the product is sold as GRD. GRD does not have quite as many rare elements as Azomite®, but it contains much lower aluminum, lead, and arsenic levels. It’s worth considering that Cannabis accumulates metals found in the soil, so if growing for smoke, GRD will contribute less impurities to the end product. The magnesium levels found in GRD is perfect for recycling soil, and contributing a slow but balanced level of magnesium.

Basalt: Basalt Rock Dust is made from igneous rock which means it hasn’t been processed or had any of nutrients leached, as consequence it has most of the rare elements found in Azomite®, while having incredibly low levels of the elements that are more toxic (lead, arsenic, etc.). Basalt has quite a high amount of silica, and weathers much quicker than any other rock dust, so it becomes available quicker. It’s also a good slow source of Phosphorus & Potassium, and will balance the pH of the soil. It provide some of the lowest sodium levels of any rock dust, and is found in great amounts, so generally speaking one of the cheapest of the rock dust. Glacial Rock Dust and Basalt together provide all the elements needed for mineralization of a medical garden, in my anecdotal experience.

Gypsum: Gypsum is Calcium Sulfate, so unlike the rest of the rock dust, it is not a composite of many different minerals and trace elements. However, it’s such a powerhouse it’s the one rock dust you absolutely shouldn’t omit. It helps with aeration in compacted soil, desalting the soil, provides an excellent source of calcium as well as sulfur, while balancing the soil pH. more. When trying to keep proper magnesium levels in your soil for recycling I’d recommend using gypsum for liming agent rather than dolomite, as not only will gypsum not add unneeded magnesium to the soil, it will provide more immediately available calcium than most other organic sources, such as oyster shell flour. Combining oyster shell flour and gypsum in your compost, top dressing, and soil will provide more than enough calcium to never use a product like cal-mag again. Topdressing gypsum as you begin bringing out the fade in your plant will provide a source of sulfur, increasing the terpene content before harvest.

Sea-90: Sea-90 is produced by solar dehydrating seawater trapped in retention ponds located in a secluded coastal area; in other words unrefined sea salt. Sea-90 is not a rock dust but since it’s used for remineralization I wanted to include it. Now, since Sea-90 is produced from seawater it contains a staggering amount of sodium and chloride, roughly 77% of each sea-90 crystal in fact. This massive amount of sodium and chlorine will definitely have an effect on microbiotic life, some of which can not handle the osmotic stress and toxicity. Sea-90 is water soluble though, and with the remaining 23% of each sea-90 crystal being minerals, metals, and elements it has the advantage of not having to wait for a rock dust to weather, but with the relatively toxic nature of chlorine and sodium, water solubility may not warrant it’s usage.

Now that you’re familiar with the differences between each product, you can start making your mineral mix confidently. For those of you curious about what I use personally, my mineral mix is:
2 part Oyster Shell Flour
2 part Gypsum
1 part Glacial Rock Dust
1 part Basalt
1 part Calcium Bentonite – I didn’t include more information about this, as it’s a clay and not used strictly for remineralization but instead for increasing the cation-ion exchange capacity of the soil.
This mineral mix is used at a rate of 3 cups per cuFt of soil

We just smiled n waved sittn there on that sack o seeds

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 1, 2020 12:08 pm
Canna_Educator_, twisted1, monkeydo and 1 people liked
Phenohunter88
(@leafnation88)
Geraniol
100 Likes
Percy Grower
Points: 713

@hart Sorry, expanded clay pellets for aeration. Also helped stretch the soil out. 

Hey, if i'm not back in ten minutes...call the Police

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 1, 2020 2:15 pm
Hart
 Hart
(@hart)
Caryophyllene
250 Likes
500 Likes
100 Likes
Grow Off Diary
1K Likes
Respected Member
Points: 14887

@leafnation88 Thanks, I was thinking red lava rock, lol. I'm actually thinking about incorporating lava rock in before planting for the same reasons. 

We just smiled n waved sittn there on that sack o seeds

ReplyQuote
Posted : April 1, 2020 2:56 pm
Page 2 / 2

In our cannabis growers forum, we have guides to growing cannabis, cannabis grow dairies that cover growing weed in hydroponics, soil and coco. Find the help you need, by either, using the search box, or asking for help in the forum.

 

Our cannabis growers website also has competitions where you can win free weed seeds. As a member you will also have discount codes for cannabis seeds, and LED grow Lighting.
Our Cannabis Growers Forum is for educational purposes and we encourage our members to check their country of residence legislation before germinating a marijuana seed.

 

This site is here because we want to help you grow your own cannabis for personal use. Therefore, any member who is suspected of growing cannabis for commercial gains will be banned immediately.

 

Please read our forum rules, and enjoy the site.

 

Percys Grow Room Facebook Page, Cannabis grower forum fb page,
Percys Grow Room Twitter,
Percys Grow Room Instagram

 

Find us on all social networks! Just search for Percys Grow Room

 

 

February 22, 2020